Using Question Banks in Storyline: activity to identify palm trees

This time, I learned how to use Question Banks in Storyline. Question banks are really useful to randomize and organize related questions within a course.

The idea

Since my visit to a Botanic Garden last month, I became more interested in the different types of palm trees, as I learned there are so many species in the world, that identification is sometimes difficult. I created an activity to learn how to easily classify a palm tree based on its key characteristics: leaves, trunk, and height.

The design

The Question Bank of this demo contains 9 questions, grouped in two quizzes of 5 questions each. Each question is formed by 4 slides, so I had to link them in the Draw.

The question layout is based on the example shared by Montse Anderson, where you get instant feedback from the correct answer. I must admit there are a few points to improve, the navigation, for example, I didn’t use the default player, so buttons might be sometimes confusing. The objective is to encourage the learner to practice, showing their progress in the Results slide.

Palmtrees-QBanks

What I learned

Quizzes are really easy to manage with Question Banks. You can even randomize question draws to keep quizzes from being predictable. Or you can group related slides to be presented together. Question banks can be reused or imported from another project.

Click on the image to view the demo.

PalmTrees

Next time you see a palm tree, I’m sure you’ll identify some features you didn’t recognize before;)

 

 

Convert a double-entry table using Storyline

Imagine that you need to include a large double-entry table in your e-learning course, but you want to avoid scrolling up and down. You can convert this type of chart into an interactive double-tab navigation table in 4 simple steps using Storyline.

Double-entrytable

  1. Set up tabs for rows and columns. Each tab should have at least three states: Normal, Hover and Selected. Make sure each group of tabs is a Button set.
  2. Create as many layers as cells the table contents. Label each layer to avoid confusion when adding the triggers.
  3. Add triggers: “Show layer A-1 when user clicks Tab A and Shape 1 is equal to Selected” and the other way back: “Show layer A-1 when user clicks Tab 1 if Shape A is equal to Selected”
  4. Copy and paste the triggers to each combination of tabs.
Click on the image to see the result Essentialvitmins

Check out another example of double-tab navigation in this post

Double-tab navigation: Colored sand beaches

The Idea:

It was 2006, in those days social networks were not as popular as they are now, and people used to forward emails through large mailing lists. One day I received a PowerPoint about the colored sand beaches around the world and I was so amazed by the pictures it contained, that I saved it in my Documents folder.

A couple of months ago, cleaning up the folder, I realized I had kept that Powerpoint all that time, and decided to convert it into something more interactive. Click on the image to see the result:

coloredsandbeaches

The Research:

Searching on the web, I found lots of pictures, videos and articles about the coloured sand beaches. All images included are under Creative Commons licence; in total, almost 40 pictures and 4 videos were included. In the web of the University of Georgia, I found a sample image collection of sand from around the world. I picked the most representative samples, those from the beaches that I had written about.

Most of the information is from blog Sand Atlas and from the U.S. Geological Survey. Check the rest of the sources on the Credits section.

The Design: rounded tabs, borders and buttons!

Using basic shapes, I gave every element in this demo a rounded style. Top tabs are ovals that grow double the size when they’re selected and Bottom tabs are simply two overlapped ovals.

To create the double-tab interaction, I needed 50 layers and 20 triggers! And 12 T/F variables for the customized Menu. Enjoy!

The transparent echo effect for image backgrounds

This week the Articulate team shared a super easy technique used in advertisements and presentation backgrounds: the echo effect. This effect is achieved by duplicating one of the images and placed it on the background. The background image is scaled beyond the slide size and transparency is increased to blend the image into the background.

Watch the tutorial where Tom Kuhlmann explains clearly how to do it:

My sample:

To create this cover, I used images of a cooker showing a prepared food in different poses.  Background photo was scaled and blurred. On top I added a shape with a transparency of 70% and placed the other image. Finally, I imported the PowerPoint slide to Storyline.

healthy eating cover

Very cool design tip! Check out other great examples in the Weekly Challenge 117

Credits:

Images by Photl

Font: KaushanScript by Impallari Type. SIL Open Licence

Most common test questions used in eLearning

Test-questionsI wish to begin this section of the blog by making a presentation of the most common assessments used to measure learner’s progress in eLearning.

This summary is based on Chapter 5 “Tests” from the book “E-Learning by Design” by William Horton. This book gives a detailed description of every type of assessments, and also provides examples and tips to write effective tests and provide meaningful feedback.

Click on the image to view the presentation

If you haven’t read this excellent book, you can take a look at the recorded presentations available on Horton’s website.

 

Interactive map: 12 Best fountains of Rome

FountainsI used to teach Geography, so I love maps and everything related to cartography and spatial representation of data. Maps are used throughout all the sciences and in virtually every aspect of our day-to-day life.

When I heard Weekly Challenge number 86 was about interactive maps for e-learning, I thought it was the perfect opportunity to create a thematic map. The week of  Challenge 86, I was on holidays in Rome, and besides the ancient monuments you can visit in this beautiful city; I was impressed by the large quantity of water fountains you can find everywhere. so I selected 12 of which I consider are the most spectacular fountains, and located on a map. Although this is a personal selection, I think you might agree with me in most of them.

All information about the fountains is based on Wikkipedia-List of fountains in Rome. Some images are licenced under Creative Commons, others are public domain. The ribbon used for the title is from FreePik.

This demo is also available in Spanish

Branching scenario: What kind of Leader are you?

This time I decided to build my first branching scenario. Reading the posts of The Rapid elearning blog, I learned about the power of scenarios: this model allows learners to make decisions as in real world, each choice leads to a consequence and feedback, engaging  learners by pulling out the information they need.

The idea of Challenge number 23leaders-scenariowas to transform a static infographic about the leadership styles into a branching scenario. By having all the choices from the infographic; it was easier to assemble the slides and to create the flow.

I decided to use silhouettes in a dark red colour, to represent the leadership concept, and kept the same colour consistently thoughout all the scene for buttons and titles.  However, in the final slide, where the kind of leader is revealed, I wanted the user to understand there were different type of leaders, so I set up a True/Falsevariable for each leader, and added a final slide where the learner can compare the main values of each leader.leaders

Click on the image above to launch the questionnaire.

I had great time building this scenario, it was fun and I practised with variables and triggers. Using Illustrator, I vectorized the comic images, so they look more clean and the style match better with the silhouettes. I’m the Coach, what kind of leader are you?