Double-tab navigation: Colored sand beaches

The Idea:

It was 2006, in those days social networks were not as popular as they are now, and people used to forward emails through large mailing lists. One day I received a PowerPoint about the colored sand beaches around the world and I was so amazed by the pictures it contained, that I saved it in my Documents folder.

A couple of months ago, cleaning up the folder, I realized I had kept that Powerpoint all that time, and decided to convert it into something more interactive. Click on the image to see the result:

coloredsandbeaches

The Research:

Searching on the web, I found lots of pictures, videos and articles about the coloured sand beaches. All images included are under Creative Commons licence; in total, almost 40 pictures and 4 videos were included. In the web of the University of Georgia, I found a sample image collection of sand from around the world. I picked the most representative samples, those from the beaches that I had written about.

Most of the information is from blog Sand Atlas and from the U.S. Geological Survey. Check the rest of the sources on the Credits section.

The Design: rounded tabs, borders and buttons!

Using basic shapes, I gave every element in this demo a rounded style. Top tabs are ovals that grow double the size when they’re selected and Bottom tabs are simply two overlapped ovals.

To create the double-tab interaction, I needed 50 layers and 20 triggers! And 12 T/F variables for the customized Menu. Enjoy!

Labelled interactive image: Las Meninas

meninas2A couple of years ago, when visiting Museo del Prado in Madrid, I was amazed by one of the masterpieces of the Spanish painter Diego Velázquez. Back at home, I created a labelled image with a free software called Images Actives.

Unfortunately, this freeware hasn’t been updated since 2011, and this week when I tried to revamp the first version of the file, I got some bugs especially when zooming the image details.

For this new version of the labelled image, I used Storyline. I set up one scene linked to a Spanish and English description, using the information of Wikipedia in both languages. And I added a simple drag-n-drop interaction activity.                                                                                                      Click on the image to launch demo

Today museums  are exploring digital technologies to enhance the visitor experience. Labelled images have a great potential to make it more interactive and immersive; offering a visual description of the works of art that can be seen in museums and galleries.

The transparent echo effect for image backgrounds

This week the Articulate team shared a super easy technique used in advertisements and presentation backgrounds: the echo effect. This effect is achieved by duplicating one of the images and placed it on the background. The background image is scaled beyond the slide size and transparency is increased to blend the image into the background.

Watch the tutorial where Tom Kuhlmann explains clearly how to do it:

My sample:

To create this cover, I used images of a cooker showing a prepared food in different poses.  Background photo was scaled and blurred. On top I added a shape with a transparency of 70% and placed the other image. Finally, I imported the PowerPoint slide to Storyline.

healthy eating cover

Very cool design tip! Check out other great examples in the Weekly Challenge 117

Credits:

Images by Photl

Font: KaushanScript by Impallari Type. SIL Open Licence

Image Gallery: Compare different types of lettuce

Weekly Challenge nº84 was about creating an example of Image slider or Photo gallery. My first idea was to build a slideshow, because I wanted the images to stand out, and slideshows and carrousels are visual design patterns which instantly grab user’s attention with images.

I decided to present the most common types of leafy lettuce; I had the pictures and descriptions, but (after many attempts) I couldn’t rotate the scrolling panel into a horizontal position. There are some videos explaining how to do that, but I had 14 pics to include and found it difficult rotating them all together; I got some errors and images didn’t scroll smoothly. So I ended up building an interactive presentation with buttons, the effect is similar, and it works fine.

Click on the image below to viewLettuces the presentation.

Hope Storyline adds the option of horizontal scrollbar in future updates 😉

 

Step Graphics: 3 basic Yoga poses

Step graphics are interactive explanations that make it easy for learners to sequentially walk through a process, workflow, procedure, or related items. They can be used for all types of learning interactions, from procedural training to interactive storytelling.

The aim of Weekly Challenge nº 36 was to create a step graphic to communicate a process. I started to take Yoga lessons last year, so I was inspired to create a quick guide of Yoga poses for beginners.

There are tons of free videos of yoga, but I needed my own characters showing the pose step by step. At the website yoga.com, I found good tutorials of the poses I had decided to illustrate. Pausing the videos at every change of position, I took 4-5 screenshots of every sequence. After that, I drew every image in an illustrated style, using Illustrator’s calligraphic brushes. Finally, I created a slide for every pose in Storyline.
Yoga-poses.

Reference: Yoga.com

 

Navigation menu: 7 Wonders of Nature

7_Wonders_NatureThis week challenge #79 was about creating a custom Navigation Menu. In coincidence with the Earth Day, I decided to quickly build a demo showing the 7 Wonders of Nature, based on the list of The New 7 Wonders of the World. In this demo, navigation combines drop-down menu and Next-Prev buttons, everything created in Storyline, playing with triggers and states. For every slide, description of the Wonders are based on Wikipedia and all images are Creative Common licenced. Click on the image and learn more about these beautiful places!

Free Safety Icons

Weekly Challenge nº78 is about creating our own icon set to share with the e-learning community. In the recent Challenge, nº73 Design a Cover for an odd title of an eLearning course, I had chosen the theme of Workplace Safety Course. This time, I decided to create the icons for that course, and as I’ve just started using Illustrator; this was a perfect opportunity to practice.

Safety-iconsThe Style

Inspired by this free set of icons from Freepik, I applied the same colors and style to my icons. Except from the Food safety icon, I drew the rest using Illustrator, combining shapes and lines. For the Chemical safety icon, I modified one of the icons I used in the Cover mentioned above.

Feel free to download my Set of Safety icons